Awkwardbear

Aug 20
tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either
scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
the idea to put ants on stilts
there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
confused ants

tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either

  • scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
  • the idea to put ants on stilts
  • there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
  • confused ants
Aug 20
thisgirlgames:

Minecraft [20/∞]

thisgirlgames:

Minecraft [20/∞]
Aug 20

theinsufferablefan:

chocobo-strider:

get-your-lame-on:

Andrew Hussie, everyone!

This is really fucking cute.

this is actually what he does when he goes on hiatus

Aug 20
earthstory:

From fire opal to white opal
An amazing specimen from Ethiopia shows how the structure of silica spheres and the impurities present can change during growth of minerals. The nodule started off as orange fire opal (see http://tinyurl.com/mpfzpbu) without any flashing display of colour, and later changed to white precious opal, displaying some play of colour.
Loz

Image credit: Opalinda

earthstory:

From fire opal to white opal

An amazing specimen from Ethiopia shows how the structure of silica spheres and the impurities present can change during growth of minerals. The nodule started off as orange fire opal (see http://tinyurl.com/mpfzpbu) without any flashing display of colour, and later changed to white precious opal, displaying some play of colour.

Loz

Image credit: Opalinda

Aug 20
thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

Aug 20
parallelpie:

nopls

parallelpie:

nopls

Aug 20

stories-yet-to-be-written:

EpicDash: 32 Surreal Places On Earth That Belong In A Dream, Part 2. 

Part 1 here

1: Turquoise Ice, Lake Baikal, Russia. Lake Baikal is the largest and oldest freshwater lake in the world. In the winter, the lake freezes, but the water is so clear that you can see 130 feet below the ice. In March, frost and sun cause cracks in the ice crust, which results in the turquoise ice shards we see at the surface.

2: Pamukkale Hot Springs, Turkey. Over millions of years, the hotsprings in Pamukkale have transformed the landscape. Although it may look like these terraces are made of ice and snow, Turkey has bikini weather all year round. The ground is just coated in white limestone.

3: Sentinels of the Arctic, Finland. These sentinels are actually giant trees covered in snow and ice. This strange sight occurs in winter, when temperatures range from -40 to -15 degrees centigrade.

4: Yuanyang County, China. The farming techniques in Yuanyang County have created a landscape which is truly amazing from the air. These rice fields are located on the slopes of Ailao Mountain, where the terraced levels help create flat surfaces along an uneven landscape.

5: Fly Geyser, Nevada, USA. Fly Geyser was accidentally created when a well was drilled and left uncapped. Minerals and algae started to rise from the geyser and accumulated to form an alien-like mound.

6: Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, Wyoming, USA. Grand Prismatic Hot Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. The vivid colors in the spring are the result of pigmented bacteria, which grow around the edges of the mineral-rich water.

7: Underwater Waterfall, Mauritius Island. Strong ocean currents continually drive sand from the shores of Mauritius into the abyss below, creating this one-of-a-kind underwater waterfall.

8 & 9: Sea of Stars, Vaadhoo Island, Maldives. It may look normal during daylight, but at night, this beach comes to life. The sparkle in the water comes from marine microbes called phytoplankton. The galaxy they paint across the shore is nothing short of breathtaking.

10: Glowworm Caves, Waitomo, New Zealand. Thousands of tiny glowworms hang to the ceiling of this grotto and radiate a luminescent light, creating a scene straight out of a sci-fi movie.

Source

Aug 20

bobbycaputo:

This is a Cut and Polished Chinga Meteorite

Seen here is a 773 gram polished Chinga meteorite. The quarter-cut specimen was found in Turvinskaya, Russia and has been cut and polished on two sides. The rest of the meteorite retains its natural light brown crust, creating a dramatic contrast. This particular specimen, which was offered by Arizona Skies Meteorites has been sold, but more of this meteorite can be found online.

The Chinga meteorite is an iron meteorite and its total chemical composition is: 82.8% iron, 16.6% nickel, and the rest mostly cobalt and phosphorus. Fragments of the meteorite were found in 1913 by gold diggers in Tuva near the Chinge River after which it is named. (Via.)

Aug 20

[x]

Aug 20
chimeracorp:

Still to this day my favorite comic

chimeracorp:

Still to this day my favorite comic